Izzi Batt-Doyle: from oblivion to Olympian

Whyalla runner Izzi Batt-Doyle (middle) with her mother Rosey Batt and stepfather Chris Brougham after competing in a half-marathon in the USA. Photo: supplied.
Whyalla runner Izzi Batt-Doyle (middle) with her mother Rosey Batt and stepfather Chris Brougham after competing in a half-marathon in the USA. Photo: supplied.

After years of rigorous training and pushing herself to the limit physically, Izzi Batt-Doyle officially became an Olympian last week, competing in the 5000m at the Tokyo Olympics.

Izzi's Whyalla ties lie with her stepdad Chris Brougham, who runs Des's Cabs, and got her running long distances at an early age.

Battling the fierce competition as well as the hot, humid conditions, Izzi made her childhood dream come true by taking to the world stage and putting in a great run, finishing in 28th place in the heat.

While Izzi she admitted to being disappointed with her time of 15:21, the run saw her give absolutely everything with her proud parents watching on.

"I gave it everything I had on the day and I'm proud of myself for that!" she said in an Instagram post after the race.

Having battled injuries in recent years, Izzi was still rehabbing a broken foot at the beginning of 2020 and at the time seriously considered quitting competitive running.

"I'm so glad I didn't, as I've achieved more than I'd have ever imagined in the last 12 months and I know there is so much still ahead of me," she said.

"One of my main goals as an athlete is to inspire others, and I feel like I've been able to do that this year so that makes me really happy.

"I hope I can show people who feel plagued by injury that you can overcome them and come out better on the other side."

Izzi said she would aim to be a role model to girls and women and show that there's no one body size or shape for distance runners.

"Sometimes running around in circles seems pointless, but it turns out it's the best way I can help other people feel something so I'll keep doing it," she said.

Her stepfather Chris Brougham was proud of how Izzi handled the tough conditions.

"You go into the race hoping you run the best you ever have and so you have to live with the disappointment when you can, but her journey is quite incredible," he said.

"It was basically from oblivion to Olympian - 12 months ago she wasn't going to the Olympics, and now she has been there and done it.

"Now that the dust is settled she'll come home, knuckle down and have another go."

This story Izzi Batt-Doyle: from oblivion to Olympian first appeared on Whyalla News.