Details for this Saturday's federal election

Those who haven't already voted are prepared to head to the polls this Saturday, May 18 to decide who the Member for Macquarie will be for the next three years.

Named after Governor Lachlan Macquarie, the seat of Macquarie covers about 4,374 square kilometres and includes both the Hawkesbury and Blue Mountains Local Government Areas (LGAs).

Time to decide: Voters will go to the polls this Saturday, May 18. Picture: Krystyna Pollard.

Time to decide: Voters will go to the polls this Saturday, May 18. Picture: Krystyna Pollard.

The seat is currently held by Susan Templeman with a 2.2 per cent margin following her victory at the 2016 election that saw the Liberals' Louise Markus deposed.

Five candidates will appear on the ballot paper at this year's federal election for Macquarie; Ms Templeman (ALP), Hawkesbury councillor Sarah Richards for the Liberal Party, Kingsley Liu for the Greens, Greg Keightley for the Animal Justice Party and Tony Pettitt for the United Australia Party.

The seat is currently held by Susan Templeman with a 2.2 per cent margin following her victory at the 2016 election that saw the Liberals' Louise Markus deposed.

The order of candidates on the ballot paper is Ms Richards at number one, Mr Liu in second spot, Ms Templeman in third, Mr Keightley in fourth and Mr Pettitt occupying the final position.

Voting is compulsory at the federal election and early voting is available in Richmond (5/209-211 Windsor Street) or Windsor (1-3/485 George Street) today (Thursday) from 8.30am to 5.30pm, and tomorrow (Friday) from 8.30am to 6pm. Both locations have assisted wheelchair access.

Voters will receive two ballot papers: a green one for the House of Representatives, or Lower House, and a large white one for the Senate or Upper house. The green ballot paper decides who will represent the seat of Macquarie, while the white ballot decides who will represent NSW in Federal Parliament.

Every box on the green ballot paper must be numbered in the order of your choice, while voters can choose to vote either above or below the line in the senate.

If voting above the line in the senate, at least six boxes of the parties or groups must be numbered. When voting below the line, at least 12 boxes must be numbered.

For a full list of polling places visit www.aec.gov.au and click on Where Can I Vote?