FILM REVIEW: Long Shot

Seth Rogen and Charlize Theron in a politically-charged rom-com - that's a concept destined to be a recipe for success.

And a success it is - Long Shot is hilarious, on point and a genuinely good way to spend a couple of hours.

The film follows newly-unemployed leftie journalist Fred Flarsky (Rogen) as he reconnects with his old babysitter - who also happens to be US Secretary of State Charlotte Field (Theron).

Field is making a presidential run and early personality surveys reveal she is pretty well liked in most categories, but could be funnier (because perceived humour, as we all know, is one of the most important skills a woman needs when running a country).

To fix her deemed shortcoming in the laughs department, Field sets about hiring a writer to 'punch up the funny' in her speeches.

Enter Fred, out of work and ready to help out a politician he believes in - as long as she promises to actually do what she's saying.

Hard at work: Speechwriter Fred Flarsky (Seth Rogen) works with Secretary of State Charlotte Field (Charlize Theron) alongside Maggie (June Diane Raphael) and Tom (Ravi Patel) in Long Shot, rated M, in cinemas now.

Hard at work: Speechwriter Fred Flarsky (Seth Rogen) works with Secretary of State Charlotte Field (Charlize Theron) alongside Maggie (June Diane Raphael) and Tom (Ravi Patel) in Long Shot, rated M, in cinemas now.

That's about all you need for plot, because this movie is about the jokes and the chemistry between Rogen and Theron.

Once you see them onscreen together it's hard to believe that haven't been paired up before.

Rogen is his usual, awkward, stoner-y self while Theron is pure class, fierce and just a little fed up with all the inequality surrounding women in politics.

The supporting cast in Long Shot is also brilliant.

MVP goes to O'Shea Jackson Jr, son of NWA rapper-turned-actor Ice Cube.

Jackson is hilarious in the best friend role (you know, the one that would go to Judy Greer if this film was gender-swapped) and it is a joy to watch him.

Better Call Saul's Bob Odenkirk plays a dopey president who was elected because he played a president on TV for years while Andy Serkis (best-known for his motion-capture roles as Gollum in Lord of the Rings and King Kong in the epic of the same name) is a Rupert Murdoch-esque media mogul who serves as the villain of the film.

There are also appearances from Lisa Kudrow (Friends) and Alexander Skarsgard (True Blood), who plays the dorky Canadian prime minister.

Rating 7.5/10