FILM REVIEW | Everything Everywhere All At Once

You're not prepared for Everything Everywhere All At Once.

This movie is so inventive, so wacky, so bonkers that there's simply no way that you can be mentally prepared for what's coming.

The incredible film follows Evelyn (Michelle Yeoh), a Chinese immigrant who is overwhelmed and disappointed by her life. She's trying in vain to complete her family's taxes, run their laundromat, connect with her daughter and look after her ailing father - meaning she doesn't have any time for her marriage, and her husband Waymond is overlooked.

Nothing about that seems trippy until a random John Connor-esque multiverse version of Waymond (The Goonies' Ke Huy Quan) inhabits his body and tells Evelyn she's the only one that can stop a massive threat to the multiverse.

And he explains the universe by casually quoting a 2000 one-hit wonder as if it was dogma: "your clothes never wear as well the next day and your hair never falls in quite the same way".

Trippy: Stephanie Hsu, Michelle Yeoh and Ke Huy Quan star in the trippiest, most entertaining film you're going to see in a while - Everything Everywhere All At Once, rated MA15+, in cinemas now. Picture: A24

Trippy: Stephanie Hsu, Michelle Yeoh and Ke Huy Quan star in the trippiest, most entertaining film you're going to see in a while - Everything Everywhere All At Once, rated MA15+, in cinemas now. Picture: A24

Next thing you know, Evelyn is calling on the abilities her multiverse self has gathered in other universes - whether that's martial arts, sign spinning, knife skills or more - to keep the evil at bay.

The evildoer, meanwhile, is apparently called 'Jobu Tupaki', leading to one of the most hilarious lines from the film: "now you're just making up sounds!"

At its heart, Everything Everywhere All At Once is a hugely relatable story about family disconnect, lost dreams and dissatisfaction with the way life has played out.

But the story is told through thoroughly inventive science fiction with great humour, action and design.

It boggles the mind how someone could have come up with some of the rules of this multiverse. For example, in order to 'verse jump' and access the skills of another version of yourself, you have to do something absurd and unexpected. That leads to people licking walls, blowing on each other's noses and stapling things to their own foreheads - and those are just some mild examples.

The film has hints of 2001 Jet Li movie The One, a little of The Terminator, some French surrealism thrown in and some of the style of Wong Kar-Wai.

It's truly a must-see.

Rating: 8.5/10

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