WATCH

Watch green turtle hatchlings make their way to the ocean from Raine Island, Queensland

Raine Island conservationists have managed to bring the endangered green turtle back from the brink after more than 30 years of global endangerment.

The population around Queensland's Cape York Peninsular has been in decline for three decades, but in the past three years, record numbers of hatchlings have taken to the oceans.

In 2019, the Great Barrier Reef Foundation's Raine Island Restoration Project recorded 64,000 nesting turtles during its peak breeding season.

Another 12,000 were counted during the latest research trip last year.

Raine Island continues to be the world's largest green turtle nesting site.

"Over the next decade, millions more hatchlings will begin life on the Reef due to the project's work increasing nesting areas and installing fences to keep nesting females safe from cliff falls," a spokesperson for the restoration project said in a statement.

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Conservationists have worked to restore the Raine Island population of endangered green turtles. Picture: Great Barrier Reef Foundation (supplied)

Conservationists have worked to restore the Raine Island population of endangered green turtles. Picture: Great Barrier Reef Foundation (supplied)

This story Bumper breeding season for endangered green turtles first appeared on Newcastle Herald.