Two boys from jumping castle tragedy moved out of intensive care

Two of the children involved in the Hillcrest Primary School jumping castle tragedy have been moved out of intensive care and are in a stable condition.

Last Thursday a Tasmanian primary school celebration turned into a tragedy when a jumping castle blew into the air causing the deaths of six children.

Images of one of the recovering children have been posted online, showing the boy enjoying a pizza.

"It has been one tough week. My little nephew Declean was involved with the Hillcrest Primary school jumping castle tragedy," the boy's uncle, David Best, wrote on Facebook.

Picture: Supplied

Picture: Supplied

"He has put up one hell of a fight and is now awake and has a long road ahead. Well done little dude and enjoy that requested (pizza emoji).

"So proud of you. Stay strong and see you soon.

"My heart still breaks for the family's that lost there loved ones."

Premier Peter Gutwein said it was very welcome news for the entire Tasmanian community to hear that two children were out of intensive care.

"The two boys who are in the Royal Hobart Hospital are steadily improving and are now in a stable condition ... and have been moved out of the ICU," Mr Gutwein said.

"I'm certain that all Tasmanians would join me in sending their thoughts and wishes to their two families at this time at what no doubt is a very difficult set of circumstances but it is pleasing," he said.

"I knew we are all very thankful that they are out of the ICU and in a much better condition."

Chace Harrison, Zane Mellor, Jalailah Jayne-Maree Jones, Jye Sheehan, Addison Stewart and Peter Dodt.

Chace Harrison, Zane Mellor, Jalailah Jayne-Maree Jones, Jye Sheehan, Addison Stewart and Peter Dodt.

The funeral of Zane Mellor, who is one of the six children who died, is being held today.

"My thoughts are with Zane's family, friends, classmates and the entire Hillcrest School Community in what is a very, very sad time. I know they remain in the thoughts and prayers of all Tasmanians," Mr Gutwein said.

"This is a very difficult time, and for all of those six families of those children who tragically died, you will forever be in our hearts and minds," he said.

"For the two who, importantly, have improved in hospital, I am certain that Tasmanians best wishes remain with them as well."

This story Two boys from jumping castle tragedy moved out of intensive care first appeared on The Examiner.