Sept 18-24: Monsterland, Joanna Lumley's Unseen Adventures, Schumacher, The Suicide Squad

Monsterland

Hulu, Apple TV

CREEPY: Nicole Beharie and Anthony Hervey in a scene from horror anthology series Monsterland, above, and Joanna Lumley shares her Unseen Adventures, below.

CREEPY: Nicole Beharie and Anthony Hervey in a scene from horror anthology series Monsterland, above, and Joanna Lumley shares her Unseen Adventures, below.

This eight-part series is not supposed to be light-hearted viewing. It's dark and twisted and unpleasant, but at the same time thought-provoking.

Each episode is a separate story and is set in different American cities - but there is a common thread. Humans and their deepest - and darkest - secrets. There are supernatural elements to the storylines but they only distract the viewer from the core message of the series: that the real monsters are within us. They are us. They're human.

Episode one is about a young but world-weary single mother who works as a waitress in a rat-infested cafe and meets a man who offers her money for a place to stay. She needs the cash but at what cost? And can she live with herself for desiring a very different life than the one she has?

Episode two looks at a teen gamer who dropped out of high school to take care of his mother. He sees some kind of shadow in his room and starts talking to an online group who claim they have seen the shadow creatures too, and urge him to attack and kill it - while live-streaming his battle.

Then there's episode three, where a young boy is briefly separated from his stepfather in a large crowd and, when he's found, he tells his mother that he was being chased by a monster. Fourteen years later, it's the mother who starts to believe that she, too, saw the monster and now it's out to get her.

Like the first season of The X-Files, each episode keeps you guessing until the very end. My only gripe is that the endings can be abrupt and leave you wanting more.

Joanna Lumley's Unseen Adventures (PG)

BBC TV, September 30

Joanna Lumley is always worth watching. Here, we are shown outtakes and behind-the-scenes footage from her popular travelogue series which starts in Japan and continues to Cuba. She encounters a fire god festival, rides the Trans-Siberian railway and discusses the physical challenges that come with the job, including filming on an icy ship and at the top of Hong Kong's highest skyscrapers. Her thirst for adventure and lifelong love of travel is infectious.

Schumacher (M)

Netflix

It's always exciting when a new documentary lands on a streaming service. They are typically informative and always entertaining.

Schumacher follows the life of seven-time Formula One champion Michael Schumacher, who was critically injured in a skiing accident in 2013. Exclusive interviews and archival footage are used to paint a portrait of a unique talent with a daring and defiant spirit.

Also keep an eye out for new release documentaries Blood Brothers: Malcolm X & Muhammad Ali; Turning Point: 9/11 and the War on Terror; and My Heroes Were Cowboys.

The Suicide Squad (MA15+)

Apple TV, Prime Amazon, YouTube, Google play, Telstra TV Box Office, Fetch

Suicide Squad (2016) was entertaining and action-packed but as for the sequel ... yes, there's action but the storyline is surprisingly difficult to follow. Also, it's about half an hour too long. Even Harley Quinn (Margot Robbie) and Bloodsport (Idris Elba) can't save this one.

REVIEWS BY LISA ROCKMAN