Hawkesbury Show 2021: Fruits and Vegetables a hit after a hard year for growers

Don Webster of Kurrajong Heights has been a Hawkesbury Show steward for 30 years. Picture: Sarah Falson
Don Webster of Kurrajong Heights has been a Hawkesbury Show steward for 30 years. Picture: Sarah Falson

"This year has been very, very hard for growers. The benches are usually chock-a-block with fruit. I think a lot of veggies grown in the Colo River area flooded and are now sitting down in the harbour."

Meet Don Webster, a Kurrajong Heights resident who has been a steward at the Hawkesbury Show for 30 years.

This year he's in the arts, crafts and produce pavilion, where he's stewarding the fruits and vegetables.

"What didn't grow in the drought tried to grow in the flood and it drowned. I planted beans four times before I could get them going," he told the Gazette.

Mr Webster moved to the Heights in 1968 and said he can grow a lot of things up there that people tell him he won't be able to get going, including peanuts.

"When new varieties of vegetables come in I just try to see how they go," he said.

At this year's show, he won the Most Successful Exhibition ribbon for amassing the most points with his fruits and vegetables.

He entered rhubarb, sweet corn, green beans, butter beans, persimmons, kiwifruit, carrots and more.

He also won for his tamarillos. "Winter tree tomatoes they call them," he said. "The skin is sour so you cut them and eat the inside with a spoon. Don't eat the skin because you'll never eat another one! It's sour."

He also achieved a ribbon for his buddha's hand. "It's a citrus but it's just pith. In the old days, people put it in their closets to keep moths out of clothing."

What makes an award-winning buddha's hand? "Plenty of fingers."