One death, one new case as NSW announces sweeping rules for public transport

There has been one new case and another death in NSW in the past 24 hours, after NSW's first weekend under slight more normal conditions.

And, as the working week begins, the Berejiklian Government has turned its attention to managing public transport, and says it will try to keep the trains, buses and ferries at around 20 per cent capacity as people return to work.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian said she had been pleased with people's behaviour over the weekend, announcing the single new case found among almost 6000 tests.

"The feedback I received is that in many instances people were remembering to exercise extreme caution,.. but in other examples people not so much forgot, but were too complacent," he said.

"Please don't let your guard down."

We normally encourage people to catch public transport but given the constraints in the peak and the fact we are exercising social distancing, we want people to consider different ways to get to work. We don't want people to either get the virus of spread the virus on public transport.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian

The Deputy Police Commissioner said there had been no increase in fines, and in most instances people were practising social distancing over the weekend

"The report card was a big pass for the people of NSW," he said.

Chief Health Officer Dr Kerry Chant told reporters that a man in his 60s with underlying health issues had died in hospital, taking the state's death toll to 48.

There are 100 cases being treated by NSW Health, three quarters outside the hospital system and there are six people in intensive care, two requiring ventilators, she said.

Transport Minister Andrew Constance announced sweeping social distancing measures which will be introduced to the NSW public transport network.

Only 12 people will be allowed on a regular Sydney bus, 35 people in a Waratah train carriage and 45 on a ferry, he said.

Mr Constance did not touch on regional transport, or how this may affect workers from the Illawarra or Central Coast who use public transport to commute to the city, but did say workers should continue doing their jobs from home if possible.

"We want to avoid crowded trains and buses and ferries and we want people to be safe and not contract the virus," he said.

From next Monday, Moore Park and other "employment hubs" will be opened up as a car park commuters, with shuttles services available to take people to work. Around 10km of "pop-up" bike lanes will also be installed throughout the CBD.

On public transport, more than 400,000 green stickers will show people where they will need to stand to maintain safe distancing, with drivers able to turn people away if they exceed the limits.

With more people being encouraged to cycle or drive, Mr Constance admitted worse CBD gridlock would become a reality, which was why the government was asking people to "retime their days" and continue to work from home where possible.

According to his figures, the plan to keep transport numbers at around 20 per cent of normal capacity could leave more than a million people trying to find a different way to travel to work.

Normally the public transport network carries about 2.2 million people, and on Friday it carried 570,000 - which was over capacity under the new guidelines.

Ms Berejiklian said that people should avoid travel before 10am and after 2pm, and plan their use of public transport using travel apps being updated to show expected capacity at peak hours.

"It is not a message you would give without COVID about," she said.

"We normally encourage people to catch public transport but given the constraints in the peak and the fact we are exercising social distancing, we want people to consider different ways to get to work

"We don't want people to either get the virus of spread the virus on public transport."

This story One death, one new case as NSW announces sweeping rules for public transport first appeared on Illawarra Mercury.