Windsor's Moellmer family celebrates National Corrections Day

Windsor's Chris Moellmer knows working with offenders is a tough gig - but that didn't stop the former event planner and Juvenile Justice worker from joining husband Harry at Corrective Services NSW 12 years ago. Then children Rick and Kate joined them, too.

All four work at John Morony Correctional Complex in Berkshire Park.

Tight knit: The Moellmer family work at John Morony Correctional Complex at Berkshire Park. They are pictured outside Outer Metro Correctional Centre, which is on the Complex. Picture: CNSW

Tight knit: The Moellmer family work at John Morony Correctional Complex at Berkshire Park. They are pictured outside Outer Metro Correctional Centre, which is on the Complex. Picture: CNSW

"We're really glad that the kids wanted to go ahead with careers in corrections. This is a hard job but they've taken to it and are making it their own," Chris said.

The Moellmers are among 10,000 CSNSW staff celebrated on National Corrections Day, Friday, January 17, for their dedication in rehabilitating offenders and keeping the community safe.

Community Corrections officer Chris said the family found common ground in their passion for their work and their desire to help offenders achieve better outcomes.

"This job gives us an opportunity to change the directions of offenders' lives by engaging with them and giving them a pathway to follow," the Windsor parole unit officer said.

"The kids are incredibly proud of their Dad. They've seen his passion for the work, how involved he is and how he fights to change offenders' lives and they've really taken that on board.

"The way my husband Harry sees it, he wants to stop the offending so he can protect someone from becoming a victim in the future."

During his time with CSNSW, Harry has worked to prepare inmates for the Young Adult Offenders Program and, more recently, with offenders in the Intensive Drug and Alcohol Treatment Program at Windsor. He enjoys the challenges of his role.

"You get what you give with inmates. If you talk to people in a reasonable way, you're likely to get more out of them," the 58-year-old said.

"You have the occasional bad day - I've had a knife pointed at my face once - but to this day I still get some sort of work satisfaction. The good always outweighs the bad."

Children Rick and Kate both work in the Community Corrections division, managing offenders on parole and court-ordered community-based sentences.

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