Federal MP hasn't asked Adani about jobs

Michelle Landry has never asked Adani how many ongoing jobs will flow from its new coal mine.
Michelle Landry has never asked Adani how many ongoing jobs will flow from its new coal mine.

A federal government MP admits she's never actually asked Adani how many ongoing jobs will flow from its new coal mine in central Queensland.

Michelle Landry has been a vocal supporter of the mine, saying voters in her seat of Capricornia need the jobs the project will create.

But she's admitted to never asking Adani Australia's CEO Lucas Dow just how many ongoing jobs would eventuate.

"I've had conversations with him, but I've never actually asked a specific number," she told ABC radio on Friday, a day after the company got the last approval it needs to build the mine.

"But there's thousands and thousands of jobs involved in this."

She said she didn't believe that would surprise anyone, and she would ask Mr Dow for a figure later on Friday.

But she said she knew the mine would create a total of 1500 jobs in fly-in, fly-out bases in Rockhampton and Townsville.

She also rounded on Adani protesters, saying she was sick and tired of city residents protesting about an industry that keeps their lights on.

"People want to have a good think about where things come from ... when you turn your electricity on, that comes from coal," she said.

"I'm sick and tired of people saying that we are doing the wrong thing up here."

Mr Dow has previously said the mine will create over 1500 direct jobs in north and central Queensland, and a further 6750 indirect jobs.

Adani will break ground on the site as soon as possible after the Queensland government approved its groundwater management plan on Thursday.

That was the last hurdle holding up mine construction, but it must still obtain other approvals before it can start mining.

Mr Dow hopes the first coal from the mine will be heading overseas within two years.

Australian Associated Press