FILM REVIEW | John Wick 3: Parabellum

People kept asking John Wick if he was back, and, yeah, he's back.

Keanu Reeves' one-man killing machine returns for his third go round in John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum, which is so over-the-top it can't even see the ground.

The film picks up shortly after the events of the second film, where Wick killed a fellow hitman on Continental grounds.

In the mythology of the series, the Continental hotel is sacrosanct and no 'business' - killing people - is permitted to happen inside its walls.

Therefore, Wick is excommunicated from the vast underground hitman network and a multi-million dollar hit is placed on his head.

From the opening seconds this film is pedal-to-the-metal as Wick tries to outrun and outkill those looking to collect on his contract.

There's no time to catch your breath or figure out what the hell is going on - which is a good thing because if you think about the actual plot too long it doesn't really hold water.

What cannot be denied, however, is the mastery of the production design and stunt coordination.

This film ramps up the series' already spectacular visuals to a whole new level.

Face off: John Wick (Keanu Reeves) goes up against two highly-skilled fighters in one of the more spectacular sequences of John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum, rated MA15+, in cinemas now.

Face off: John Wick (Keanu Reeves) goes up against two highly-skilled fighters in one of the more spectacular sequences of John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum, rated MA15+, in cinemas now.

Major action sequences take place in rooms made of glass on all sides - the sound guys deserve massive props for the frequency of their glass-smashing sounds - and even the New York Public Library. Wick even visits Casablanca for a spot of fighting, linking up with Halle Berry and her fearsome dogs in the process.

Despite all this, it's hard to overlook the very large number of times Wick should have been absolutely, definitively killed.

No suspension of disbelief is enough to overcome the fact he can survive countless bullet wounds, stab wounds, beatings, crashes and falls with seemingly no effect on his ability to take out other highly-trained assassins.

By the time you reach the end of the film you'll long for the days when the biggest problem John Wick had to face was an arrogant mob boss's son and his slimy goons. At least in the first film you could pretend the action was realistic - such luxuries are gone in Chapter 3.

But hey, what's the point of an action series if you can't throw logic out the window every once in a while?

Rating: 6/10