Early learning: A day in the life of a multi-tasker

Multi-tasking: Making sure the learning is fun and interactive, child care professionals are trained to help your child's education get off to a great start.
Multi-tasking: Making sure the learning is fun and interactive, child care professionals are trained to help your child's education get off to a great start.

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Starting early or finishing late, the day of a child care worker can be long and exhausting but full of laughter and fun.

So much more than just a babysitter, a child care professional keeps kids active, plays games, and sometimes constructively guide children when they misbehave. 

They also create enriching activities for children of all ages, helping them learn basic concepts and get ready for school. They can help your child explore ideas through play-based learning.

Spending their day with children, they need an abundance of patience and energy, be able to tell stories, answer myriad of questions asked by inquisitive minds, as well as report back to parents and understand any special instructions.

For little ones, this can be their first time in care so they will create an environment that is homely, warm, safe and nurturing. A seasoned child care professional can help with any separation anxiety your child may have and will have a few tried and tested techniques to help them settle into their day.

Keeping your child safe is paramount. They make sure all areas are childproofed, toys are clean and in good condition, there are no small objects around to choke on and potentially toxic substances (like cleaning supplies) are secured out of reach of children.

Chaperoning nap times, nappy changes, tantrums and toilet training; these can be some of the more challenging aspects of the day.

“Early childhood education truly shapes our nation,” says Helen Gibbons, Assistant National Secretary of United Voice, the early childhood union. 

The best start: High quality education in the early years is critical to child development: 90 per cent of brain architecture is formed by age three.

The best start: High quality education in the early years is critical to child development: 90 per cent of brain architecture is formed by age three.

“There are about 80,000 educators working in the long day care sector educating about 700,000 children in 6,900 centres across Australia.  

“Educators plan, implement and evaluate individual programs for each child in their care so they can learn, develop and grow. They ensure children have every opportunity to grow and develop into confident and positive members of our community.

“Educators are responsible for educating and caring for children and helping ensure they get the best possible start in life. 

“Valuing every child means valuing every educator.”