Relatives of killed officer Evan Clyde Williams being sought

Disrepair: Ian Colless of the NSW Police Memorial and Historical Society is seeking relatives of Constable Evan Clyde Williams to come forward.
Disrepair: Ian Colless of the NSW Police Memorial and Historical Society is seeking relatives of Constable Evan Clyde Williams to come forward.

Relatives of a local police officer killed on duty more than 60 years ago are being sought as plans for his grave to be restored in an historic Hawkesbury cemetery forge ahead.

Constable Evan Clyde Williams, a resident of South Windsor, was killed on duty on August 9, 1953 while stationed at Riverstone. Constable Williams had been riding a police motorcycle along Riverstone Road when it collided with another vehicle travelling in the opposite direction.

He was treated at the scene before being taken to Hawkesbury Hospital suffering from severe injuries, and was later transferred to Prince Henry Hospital to be operated on. He died without regaining consciousness two days later.

The Narrandera Argus and Riverina Advertiser stated on August 17, 1953, that Constable Williams had only just returned to duty after an earlier injury.

“He had resumed duty only a fortnight after having received injuries when he chased a stolen motor car, the driver of which ran his machine against an electric light pole,” the article stated.

Constable Williams was buried at historic McGraths Hill cemetery, where his grave is currently in a state of disrepair. The NSW Police Memorial and Historical Society is working to restore his grave, and society member Ian Colless is asking descendants to come forward.  

“We are seeking anyone who may have known or know the Williams family, or has any contacts in the Hawkesbury district, who could assist,” he explained. “McGraths Hill cemetery is heritage listed and any application for work normally requires permission of an ancestor or heir of the burial rights.”

Born in 1923 at Leeton, Constable Williams served in WWII where he was injured while serving as a gunner in the 2/4 Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment of the AIF. He joined the NSW Police Force in 1949.

Constable Williams’ wife Phyllis stayed in the area for a time after his death and the couple had two sons, Graham and Ian. Ian died as a child and is buried in the same location. Anyone with information should contact coll2ian@gmail.com.