Strong Bones program helps seniors defeat brittle bones

Fun fitness: Hugh Cameron, Neralee McGree, Lesley Jobson, Vivian North and Bill Tory with Strong Bones trainer Vicky White. Picture: Mikaela Mahony
Fun fitness: Hugh Cameron, Neralee McGree, Lesley Jobson, Vivian North and Bill Tory with Strong Bones trainer Vicky White. Picture: Mikaela Mahony

Castle Hill Fitness and Aquatic Centre launched its Strong Bones program on Monday (October 16).

First of it’s kind at the Castle Hill based gym, Strong Bones focuses on getting seniors active and increasing muscle growth and bone density.

Strong Bones personal trainer Vicky White said a large number of seniors at the club was a reason for the program starting.

“We want our seniors to get the most out of their weight training,” she said.

“Some are not sure what to do and how to do different exercises.

“Weight training is so important to stop osteoporosis and increase muscle growth.”

In Australia, 11 per cent of men and 27 per cent of women over the age of 60 have osteoporosis. It is a disease in which the density and quality of the bone are reduced. As bones become more porous and fragile, the risk of fracture is greatly increased.

A further 42 per cent of men and 51 per cent of women over 60 are osteopoenic which means they have a reduced amount of bone density. 

There are about 200,000 hip fractures per year in Australia because of brittle bones. 

Castle Hill resident Bill Tory signed up to the first Strong Bones class to complement the other physical activity he already does at the gym.

“I wanted to do some strength training that day-to-day I wouldn’t normally do,” he said.

“I do running, rowing, stretching and some weights but I really wanted to push myself, and do a bit more and learn some new exercises.”

Master trainer at the centre, Sue Wells, said she believes the Strong Bones program will be very effective and fun at the same time.

“The Strong Bones class has been designed to be an enjoyable way to achieve this goal.”

According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation by 2020, 14 million people over 50 are expected to have low bone mass.  

To cure osteoporosis and reduce bone density research shows that body weight bearing exercises at a low weight with a high rep count is the most beneficial for older and sedentary people who need to increase their bone mineral density. 

Details: 9846 1200. 

I do running, rowing, stretching and some weights but I really wanted to push myself, and do a bit more and learn some new exercises.

Bill Tory
This story Fit and strong bones first appeared on Hills News.

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