Hospital serenity garden to take shape with help of Lions clubs

The Serenity Garden this week after two working bees which cleared away straggly agapanthus and rotting lattice and started the new plantings. The open end of the garden looks to the back of houses on Tollgate Crescent.

The Serenity Garden this week after two working bees which cleared away straggly agapanthus and rotting lattice and started the new plantings. The open end of the garden looks to the back of houses on Tollgate Crescent.

There’s something magical about reviving a garden. Those who knew the childhood book The Secret Garden will remember how, as a neglected, unloved and sour child starts to work on an overgrown and forgotten garden, both start to blossom together. 

Hawkesbury Hospital has its own garden it is currently pouring buckets of love into, for use by palliative, dementia and mainstream patients as an escape of sensory delight from the hospital’s indoor, clinical world.  

Director of Mission Lisa Connell showed the Gazette its bare bones on Thursday, revealed by two working bees that cleared away all the old bark, straggly agapanthuses  and old lattice. “Plants were relocated, gardens dug up, road base and crushed gold graniteput down, large metal garden bed planters painted and a chalk board erected,” she said.

She pointed out the future Aboriginal bed which will have rainbow serpent painted rocks, bamboo wind chimes and kangaroo paw, the bed which will have a bus stop and letter box for use by dementia patients, the wall where Richmond High students will paint a big mural and the site for the screened outdoor room with sound system for mini-concerts and high teas.

Fragant plants like jasmine and vividly coloured flowers have begun to be planted in big tubs, a secure fence needs to be put around so dementia patients can wander freely and there are plans for a tactile sculpture.

But the garden is estimated to cost $20,000, and to that end Hawkesbury’s Lions Clubs have made their Centennial Celebration Race Day on Sunday October 8 a fundraiser for the garden, which Ms Connell said they hope to complete by November 20.

Running from 1130am-5pm, the Charity Race Day luncheon at Hawkesbury Racecourse costs $185 a ticket which includes a high quality hot and cold buffet, tap beer, red and white wine and sparkling, and soft drink all day. Businesses can get a table for 10 for $1750. There will also be a Fashions in the Field competition and Best Hat. 

The event also marks 100 years of Lions Club International, and so this event is supported by all Lions clubs in the Hawkesbury – Richmond, Windsor, Hawkesbury South and Hawkesbury Bells Line. 

Major sponsors of the event so far who have all paid $4250 for a table and race naming rights are Wide Span Sheds, Wiseberry Thompson, Richardson & Wrench Windsor, Kaboodle Finance, Pepe’s Ducks and Richmond Lions Club. 

To book a seat or a table call Roger Sherrington on 4577 7914.

Workers clear up during one of the working bees so far.

Workers clear up during one of the working bees so far.

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